Tuesday, 30 October 2012

The Filofax Storyboard page revisited

Some time ago, I created a storyboard page for the Filofax. I'm making a new version available today which includes a single but significant enhancement.


The dot grid in the picture box is new and should make it easier to align the content of that box.

You can download this as a Word file or a PDF file. In either case, print double-sided on A4 paper and crop to size where indicated to make two pages from each sheet of A4. If using the PDF versions remember to set your printer settings so as not to shrink the pages.

Tuesday, 23 October 2012

Expenses envelopes for the Filofax Pocket

I have posted here and here expenses envelopes you can print and make at home for the Filofax Personal. Today I am making equivalents available for the Filofax Pocket.

You can choose from either a portrait or a landscape layout. Here is the portrait layout:


You can download this either as a Publisher file or as a PDF file. Either way, print, fold, cut and glue as shown in the video below.



The landscape version looks like this:


Again, you can download this either as a Publisher file or as a PDF file. The envelope is made in exactly the same way.

If using the PDF versions remember to set your printer settings so as not to shrink the pages.

Saturday, 20 October 2012

Print your own dot grid pages for the A4 and A5 Filofax

I recently made available a template for dot grid pages for the Filofax personal. The pages look like this:


I received queries about making these available in other sizes too and have now produced a version that will fit A4 and A5 binders. You can download it as a Word file or as a PDF file. If using the PDF versions remember to set your printer settings so as not to shrink the pages.

If printing for the A5, you have a choice. You can either print the file double-sided as a conventional A4 page and then cut it in half, or you can print in booklet mode. Doing the latter will give you a finer grid. It's hard to describe, but try and you'll see what I mean.

Of course, you don't need to put this paper in a Filofax at all. It works pretty well as loose paper for taking notes, making sketches and particularly for things like hand-drawn flowcharts.

Saturday, 13 October 2012

The Filofax expenses envelope revisited

One of the first inserts I designed and published on the blog was the Filofax expenses envelope. Here is the post. It was popular. Some people found it difficult to understand how to fold, cut and stick the envelope together, so I made a video to demonstrate the process:


I thought I could do more with the envelope. Recently, I made a couple of new versions.

First, we have the landscape expenses envelope:

Click to enlarge
You can download this as a Publisher document or as a PDF file. If using the PDF version remember to set your printer settings so as not to shrink the pages.

Next, I had the idea of using an envelope to hold tickets for upcoming events. This version of the envelope will hold and log your tickets:

Click to enlarge
You can log the date and time, event name and the number of tickets, along with notes (where will you park, for instance, or who are you going with?). This is also available as a Publisher document or as a PDF file. Either way, print, cut and fold as explained in the video above.

Friday, 12 October 2012

Teachers' planner now available to download

I've been helping Saz of JarFM produce a planner especially for teachers, and we're now at the point that people can try it out.

 
 
We've found a way to build the pages so that you get this layout for weekdays and a more conventional layout for weekends with Satruday and Sunday spread together actoss two pages. It's hard to describe, so go and have a look on Saz's blog, where you can see for yourself, download the files and play.
 

 

Thursday, 11 October 2012

Download and print dot grid paper for your Filofax

Dot grid notebooks are all the rage, and with good reason. You can see a great example hereLeuchtturm makes one and so does Rhodia.

I wanted to try this format in my Filofax, so I designed a page:


If you'd like to try these out, you can download and print your own. 


You can download the pages either as editable Word files or as PDF files. If using the PDF versions remember to set your printer settings so as not to shrink the pages.

Download the pages as a Word file or a PDF file.

Each file should be printed double-sided with the duplex set to flip along the short edge. You can then cut out and punch individual pages as outlined in this post.


Tuesday, 9 October 2012

Journalling School - download your free book

The Journalling School Book is now available.



Journalling School is a 32-page book, containing the full text of each of the Journalling School sessions from the first term:

Introduction 
Session 1: Recording your life 
Session 2: Sustainable journalling
Session 3: Restarting a journal 
Session 4: Positive journalling 
Session 5: Role play
Session 6: Personal goals 
Session 7: Problem solving 
Session 8: Keeping things fresh 
Session 9: Frequently asked questions 
Session 10: Past, present and future 
Session 11: Looking back 
Session 12: End of term review
You can download your free copy and print it at home. If you have benefited from Journalling School and would like to make a contribution, you can do so using the PalPal button below. Pay whatever you like. This is strictly voluntary and you don't have to pay anything at all.


Monday, 8 October 2012

Journalling School Session 12: End of Term Review

Welcome to the twelfth session of Journalling School. Today's session ends this first term of school.


Over the past three months or so we have taken a journey together at Journalling School. This is the end of the term and thus a good time to review how far we have come.

We began with why you would want to keep a journal and what benefits there might be in recording your life. We looked at how to get started and how to keep going. We saw how you could restart hour journal if the habit has lapsed.

Then we looked over a few weeks about using your journal to effect change. We started with an examination of positive journalling and moved on to using your journal to document and work towards your goals and also to solve problems.

We saw how to keep things fresh in your journal, using exercises and techniques (like the Total Recall ego trip.)

Towards the end of term we paused to think about some common journalling questions like what sort of journal to use and how much to write every day.

There was a session on using time narratives in your journal to write about the past, the present and the future.

Last week we considered the power of looking back in your journal.

And so, we have arrived at the end of the term and with it a break from school, although not (it is to be hoped) from journalling. 

I'm setting some holiday homework I think you will enjoy. I will also publish in the coming days a book containing all the sessions that you can download and print. I would suggest you might keep this with your journal so you can review it and gain inspiration when you need it.


Image by  David Michael Morris
used under Creative Commons Licence


Homework

Write about what your reasons were for starting a journal. Consider whether you have derived the benefits you expected. Were there any surprises?

Consider which of the exercises you have undertaken has been most enjoyable or most enlightening. Write about why and what you learned.



Here ends the first term of Journalling School. I hope that the school will return with new ideas, perspectives and exercises after a break. I have some ideas for what to cover next term and would love to hear yours. Please use the comments or email me directly at ray.blake@gmail.com.

Sunday, 7 October 2012

In development: planner for teachers

I'm really excited to see what Saz is developing for teachers. I know I have followers who are involved in teaching, and my guess is that this layout will be very popular. 

Wednesday, 3 October 2012

Download and print grid paper for your Filofax


I had so much fun making my own personal lined paper that I thought I'd make some grid paper while I was at it. Here is the outcome:


The squares are larger than the with standard Filofax version, which suits me. If it suits you too, then you're in luck.

You can download the pages either as editable Word files or as PDF files. If using the PDF versions remember to set your printer settings so as not to shrink the pages.

Download the pages as a Word file or a PDF file.

Each file should be printed double-sided with the duplex set to flip along the short edge. You can then cut out and punch individual pages as outlined in this post.

Monday, 1 October 2012

Journalling School Session 11: Looking back


Welcome to the eleventh session of Journalling School. In today's session we'll be talking about the concept of looking back at earlier journal entries and how this can influence your journalling today.



I often take the opportunity to look back in my journal. I find it fascinating to read my words of - say - five years ago. Seeing a particular phrase, or even a flourish at the end of a word can spark off a Proust-like reverie in which I am transported to the time of writing. Suddenly, forgotten sights and thoughts are recaptured and for a while I can see the past as vividly as the present day.

Other times I look back to the more recent past. Before I write on the very last page of a book I go back to the front and read the first entry that I would have written two or three months earlier. This can sometimes prompt some thoughts about the main events in the period covered by the book. Now and again I will find there has been a significant change in my life that is only appreciable in hindsight and that without my journal I would never have recognised.

So I encourage you to look back and look often, and to write about what you find. Here are some aspects you might write about:

  • What do I know now that I didn't know then?
  • What else do I remember about that time?
  • How have things changed for me since that time?
  • What did I not write about then but perhaps should have?

More than anything, looking back can tell you how far you have come and hint at how much further you might still go. I recommend it highly.

Image by  http://creativity103.com
used under Creative Commons licence


Homework

Pick a date earlier in your journal - perhaps the first entry you made, or one from an important or difficult time. Read your entry and reflect on the questions listed above. Write about the experience of looking back and the thoughts and feelings it has prompted.


That was the eleventh session of Journalling School. Next week's session will be an end of term special, reviewing all the sessions so far. After that session, Journalling School will take a break but I'll set you some holiday homework.

Feedback, thoughts and ideas are welcome, as ever. Please share your experiences in the comments.

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